Hi guys! I hope you’re doing well this fine Sunday afternoon. I’m back again with a review of this fantastic book — Internment by Samira Ahmed. This is Samira’s second book, and it’s absolutely riveting. I couldn’t put it down! I want to do a special thanks to The Novl for sending me a copy for review!

Title: Internment

Author: Samira Ahmed

Publisher: Little, Brown BFYR

Expected release: March 19, 2019

My rating: 5/5 Goodreads Stars

Rebellions are built on hope.

Set in a horrifying near-future United States, seventeen-year-old Layla Amin and her parents are forced into an internment camp for Muslim American citizens.

With the help of newly made friends also trapped within the internment camp, her boyfriend on the outside, and an unexpected alliance, Layla begins a journey to fight for freedom, leading a revolution against the internment camp’s Director and his guards.

Heart-racing and emotional, Internment challenges readers to fight complicit silence that exists in our society today.

I was riveted from page one in this book! It was absolutely fantastic. I feel that I don’t even have enough words for this book. Yes, there were some parts where I felt some of the dialogue was kinda cheesy, but genuinely, it didn’t matter.

This world created was scary familiar. I like how real Ahmed made this world. It operates in the same world as today, and the parallels are very realistic. The way things unravel and how people are interned in the book are extremely realistic, and I believe Ahmed did some research into this. I really appreciate how she reminded people that America has done this before with Japanese Americans and Japanese people. This part of American history isn’t talked about enough, and we need to remember that there is precedence for what is happening now in this nation.

I love all of the characters in the book. They made the book something incredible. As much as I hated the director, he was very compelling. I feel like he was the vitriol of hate in one person.

Layla was awesome as a character. There were a few times that I felt that she had some corny lines, but they didn’t take away from the book as a whole. Her flaws made her real, and that was what I loved the most about her.

I highly recommend this book! It puts a lot of things into context and makes you reflect a lot on yourself.

Happy reading,

Sophie 🙂

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Sneak Peek Sunday: Internment by Samira Ahmed

Posted in Bloggers, Reviews, Sophie

Sneak Peek Sunday: The Antidote by Shelley Sackier

Hi and happy Sunday! I’m here again with another installment of Sneak Peek Sunday, and today I’ll be discussing The Antidote by Shelley Sackier. I was given an ARC in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to the publisher!

Title: The Antidote

Author: Shelley Sackier

Publisher: HarperTeen

Expected release: February 5, 2019

My rating: 3/5 Goodreads stars

Magic is not allowed, under any circumstances — even if it could save someone’s life. Instead, there are herbal remedies and traditional techniques that have been painstakingly recorded in lieu of using the mystical arts. Fee knows this, so she keeps her magic a secret.

Except her best friend, Xavi, is deathly ill. He’s also the crown prince. Saving him is important, not only for her, but for the entire kingdom.

Fee’s desperation to save her friend means she can barely contain the magic inside her. And after the tiniest of slips, Fee is thrust into a dark and secretive world that is as alluring as it is dangerous.

If she gives in, it could mean she can save Xavi. But it also means that those who wish to snuff out magic might just snuff her out in the process.

Review

I have to be real with you guys, I didn’t really like this book. It wasn’t really my cup of tea. I found the world to be a bit confusing, and I couldn’t really parse out who I was supposed to ship together and who I wasn’t supposed to like other than Princess Quinn.


Part of what was confusing to me was the world itself. I didn’t really understand the rules. It seems like part of it was a fake country, but they also had the same rules as an old European country, but also they had magic? I felt this wasn’t explained very well and I felt confused the whole time reading it.

I think another part that made me iffy on this book was the dialogue. I felt that it was very stilted and didn’t work in some parts. It didn’t always move the scene forward, and I felt that I got minimal information from it.

In the end, I didn’t quite like this book. It wasn’t my cup of tea, but I think you should give it a try!! My opinion isn’t the end all, so you should read it for yourself.

Happy reading,
Sophie 🙂

Posted in Blog Tours, Bloggers, Reviews, Sophie

Sneak Peek Sunday ft. Blog Tour: Our Year of Maybe by Rachel Lynn Soloman

I’m so excited to be on this blog tour! Here is one of my highly anticipated reads, Our Year of Maybe by Rachel Lynn Soloman. Last year, Soloman debuted with her novel You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone, which was also featured right here! Check that out here. I was lucky enough to win an ARC in Rachel’s newsletter.

Title Our Year of Maybe

Our Year of Maybe

Author: Rachel Lynn Soloman

Publisher: Simon Pulse

Expected publication: January 15, 2019

Genre: Contemporary, Young Adult

My rating: 4/5 Goodreads stars

Aspiring choreographer Sophie Orenstein would do anything for Peter Rosenthal-Porter, who’s been on the kidney transplant list as long as she’s known him. Peter, a gifted pianist, is everything to Sophie: best friend, musical collaborator, secret crush. When she learns she’s a match, donating a kidney is an easy, obvious choice. She can’t help wondering if after the transplant, he’ll love her back the way she’s always wanted.

But Peter’s life post-transplant isn’t what either of them expected. Though he once had feelings for Sophie too, he’s now drawn to Chase, the guitarist in a band that happens to be looking for a keyboardist. And while neglected parts of Sophie’s world are calling to her—dance opportunities, new friends, a sister and niece she barely knows—she longs for a now-distant Peter more than ever, growing increasingly bitter he doesn’t seem to feel the same connection.

Peter fears he’ll forever be indebted to her. Sophie isn’t sure who she is without him. Then one blurry, heartbreaking night twists their relationship into something neither of them recognizes, leading them to question their past, their future, and whether their friendship is even worth fighting for.

Goodreads | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Book Depository | iTunes

About the Author

Rachel Lynn Solomon lives, writes, and tap dances in Seattle, Washington. Once she helped set a Guinness World Record for the most natural redheads in one place. She’s the author of You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone (out now from Simon & Schuster/Simon Pulse), Our Year of Maybe (1/15/19), and Today Tonight Tomorrow (2020). A short story of hers will appear in the anthology It’s a Whole Spiel (Penguin Random House/Knopf, fall 2019).

Website | Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads | Facebook| Pinterest

Review

This was such a fun read!! I couldn’t turn the pages fast enough. I absolutely loved Rachel’s debut, You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone and I had high hopes for this one. One of the main characters and I even share a name!

I love the dual POV in the book. I felt that Rachel really got into their heads, and it was well written. Sometimes I felt more connected to Sophie, but other times I felt more connected to Peter. I wish I could meet them IRL! I especially liked the new dance friends that Sophie makes. They reminded me a little of Bebe and Denice from Eleanor & Park.

There are a lot of different elements in this book, from religion to sexuality, Soloman writes in a respectful but real way. I’m always captivated by her writing. Each piece is woven in with skill that I admire greatly.

I really like her realistic portrayal of sexual health and masturbation in this book. This is also done in You’ll Miss Me When I’m Gone, and it needs to be done much more often in YA. This fights against the stigma, especially for women, in a positive way, and this definitely won points in my book.

Religion is another theme embedded within this novel. I like how Peter wants to find his and what it means to him while Sophie doesn’t really practice. It provides a good picture of how people approach this topic. I related to Peter when he talked about being caught between worlds, how he didn’t feel like he was enough of something to really claim the label. I often feel this way toward my race (Asian) because there is such a stigma and discussion about what makes someone “truly” something.

For the sake of keeping this from getting too long (seriously, I could wax poetically about this book all day), I’m going to wrap it up here. I really hope you guys read this amazing book!

Playlist

Here’s a playlist I created for the book! Unfortunately, I don’t know much Rufus Wainwright, much to Peter’s chagrin. I did include a lot of angsty songs (this book is so angsty and I love it), and one BTS song that I felt really fit the book!

Favorite Quotes

Here are a few of my favorite quotes from the books!

He is the earth, and I am the moon.

I have never been enough, and he has always been too much.



There’s something else, though, something that takes me a few moments to identify—a pang of missing. Like I miss Sophie even though she’s right here, gliding along the ice in her gray beanie, fiery hair peeking out from beneath it.

Giveaway

Prize: One (1) SIGNED copy of Our Year of Maybe.

Terms & Conditions: US only, please read the terms on the rafflecopter

Run time: January 9-20th

Link: https://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/d9681b86336/

Tour Schedule

January 9th

The Unofficial Addiction Book Fan Club – Welcome Post

January 10th

Charis Rae – Review | It Starts at Midnight – Review + Favourite Quotes | The Clever Reader – Review + Dream Cast + Favourite Quotes

January 11th

Read.Sleep.Repeat.org – Interview | A Court of Coffee and Books – Review + Favourite Quotes | Kait Plus Books – Review + Favourite Quotes

January 12th

Literary Meanderings – Guest Post | Sinfully Wicked Book Reviews – Review | Morgan Vega – Review + Playlist + Dream Cast

January 13th

The Mind of a Book Dragon – Review + Playlist + Favourite Quotes | Blunt Book Blog – Review | Amy’s Booket List – Review + Favourite Quotes

January 14th

Utopia State of Mind – Guest Post | Camillea Reads – Review | We Live and Breathe Books – Review

January 15th

The Heart of a Book Blogger – Interview | Blossoms and Bullet Journals – Review | Moonlight Rendezvous – Review + Playlist | The Layaway Dragon – Review

Posted in Bloggers, Reviews, Sophie

Sneak Peek Sunday: We Set the Dark on Fire by Tehlor Kay Mejia

Happy New Year, everyone! I hope the holiday season has treated you well. I’m here with a new review of one of my anticipated reads of the year. Seriously, guys, if you haven’t added this to your TBR, you need to right now. Thank you to the publisher for sending a copy for review! This had no influence on my reading and reviewing of this book.

Title: We Set the Dark on Fire

Author: Tehlor Kay Mejia

Publisher: Katherine Tegen Books

Expected release: February 26, 2019

My rating: 5/5 Goodreads stars

In this daring and romantic fantasy debut perfect for fans of The Handmaid’s Tale and Latinx authors Zoraida Córdova and Anna-Marie McLemore, society wife-in-training Dani has a great awakening after being recruited by rebel spies and falling for her biggest rival. 

At the Medio School for Girls, distinguished young women are trained for one of two roles in their polarized society. Depending on her specialization, a graduate will one day run a husband’s household or raise his children. Both paths promise a life of comfort and luxury, far from the frequent political uprisings of the lower class.

Daniela Vargas is the school’s top student, but her pedigree is a lie. She must keep the truth hidden or be sent back to the fringes of society.

And school couldn’t prepare her for the difficult choices she must make after graduation, especially when she is asked to spy for a resistance group desperately fighting to bring equality to Medio.

Will Dani cling to the privilege her parents fought to win for her, or will she give up everything she’s strived for in pursuit of a free Medio—and a chance at a forbidden love?

Review

Once I opened this book it was really hard to set it down. I was swept up into the world of Medio immediately, and I couldn’t wait to find out what would happen.

Dani was fun to watch grow. Her strength and evolution throughout the bus was compelling. I love how she wasn’t afraid to stick up for herself, but knew when to back down. She knew her weaknesses, and while they seemed like a setback, they proved to be a strength in the end.

I didn’t know what to think of Carmen the whole book. She seemed on the fence, never truly committed the whole time. That’s all I’ll be able to say about her without giving much away.

One of my favorite parts of the book were the Latinx elements. They were rich within the story, and slipped in flawlessly and respectfully. I couldn’t imagine a better setting.

There were so many twists and turns in the plot. I didn’t know who to trust! Everyone seemed suspect, and I didn’t even know who I wanted to win. I wish we got to know Alex more, and I hope that we do in the second book. I loved it so much, I am already dying to read book two!!!!!!

Make sure to get that pre-order because you’ll want to read it as soon as it comes out.

Happy reading,

Sophie 🙂

Sneak Peek Sunday: The Vanishing Stair by Maureen Johnson

Hey there! I hope you’re having a wonderful holiday season. I’m writing from my home in West Michigan, and I’m glad to finally be home after such a long, hard semester. I’m super excited to bring this review to you of Maureen Johnson’s newest book in the Truly Devious series — The Vanishing Stair which is set to come out January 22 of 2019. If you wanted to read my review of Truly Devious first, look no further than this link! Without further ado, here is more about the book.

Title: The Vanishing Stair

Author: Maureen Johnson

Publisher: Katherine Tegan BFYR

Expected Release: January 22, 2019

My rating: 5/5 Goodreads Stars

All Stevie Bell wanted was to find the key to the Ellingham mystery, but

instead she found her classmate dead. And while she solved that murder, the crimes of the past are still waiting in the dark. Just as Stevie feels she’s on the cusp of putting it together, her parents pull her out of Ellingham academy.

For her own safety they say. She must move past this obsession with crime. Now that Stevie’s away from the school of topiaries and secret tunnels, and her strange and endearing friends, she begins to feel disconnected from the rest of the world. At least she won’t have to see David anymore. David, who she kissed. David, who lied to her about his identity—son of despised politician Edward King. Then King himself arrives at her house to offer a deal: He will bring Stevie back to Ellingham immediately. In return, she must play nice with David. King is in the midst of a campaign and can’t afford his son stirring up trouble. If Stevie’s at school, David will stay put.

The tantalizing riddles behind the Ellingham murders are still waiting to be unraveled, and Stevie knows she’s so close. But the path to the truth has more twists and turns than she can imagine—and moving forward involves hurting someone she cares for. In New York Times bestselling author Maureen Johnson’s second novel of the Truly Devious series, nothing is free, and someone will pay for the truth with their life.

Review

This book was so epic! I couldn’t put it down once I got into it. I got it when I was in the middle of homework, and it took everything in me to not stop what I was doing and dig right in. I absolutely loved getting back into this world and re-familiarizing myself with the characters.

The book picks up right around where Truly Devious finishes. I was anxious to see what had happened to Stevie after that jaw-dropping ending. I thought this book would be the end in a duology, but there definitely will be a third book, and OH MY GOD THAT ENDING!!!!!!!!!!!!

One of my favorite parts about this book is how well it does with representation and how respectful it is of it. You can tell this was written sensitively, and all of the characters are genuine. There is pan rep, Asian-Am rep, and so many others. I really love how this is not The Thing, but A Thing. There needs to be more stories with characters doing things and living their lives — not just about their race/gender/sexuality/etc.

I also really liked how openly Stevie deals with her mental health. There is one part where she has to give herself points for doing small tasks, and that’s a really healthy coping mechanism discussed. I think this part is well written and written true to experience.

Overall, this was an amazing book! I cannot wait for the third book, and I can’t believe it’s going to be about a year until the next one!!! I highly, highly recommend you get yourself a copy. I would not miss out on this sequel!

Author Tour

Did you know Maureen Johnson is going on tour for this book?! I’m so sad this isn’t coming anywhere near me, but be sure to check out the stops and dates along with the other authors going with her! Check it out here.

Happy reading!

Sophie 🙂

Sneak Peek Sunday: The Perfect Candidate by Peter Stone

Hello there and happy Sunday!! I’m happy to be here again with another book that will come to you this Tuesday. Thank you to the publicist for sending me an early review copy! This in no way affected how I read and reviewed this text.

The Perfect Candidate
Goodreads | Amazon

Title: The Perfect Candidate

Author: Peter Stone

Publisher: Simon & Schuster BFYR

Expected release: October 2, 2018

My rating: 3/5 Goodreads stars

From debut author Peter Stone comes a heart-stopping, pulse-pounding political thriller that’s perfect for fans of Ally Carter and House of Cards.

When recent high school graduate Cameron Carter lands an internship with Congressman Billy Beck in Washington, DC, he thinks it is his ticket out of small town captivity. When he lacks connections and Beltway polish he makes up in smarts, and he soon finds a friend and mentor in fellow staffer Ariel Lancaster.

That is, until she winds up dead.

As rumors and accusations about her death fly around Capitol Hill, Cameron’s low profile makes him the perfect candidate for an FBI investigation that he wants no part of. Before he knows it—and with his family’s future at stake—he discovers DC’s darkest secrets as he races to expose a deadly conspiracy.

If it doesn’t get him killed first.


This book was pretty good overall, but slow paced in the beginning. It was really hard to get into at first, so I think that’s why I rated it lower than a four. I had a hard time getting used to Cameron’s voice, and I didn’t quite mesh with it.

This story starts right away with Cameron taking a taxi into Washington D. C. I really liked that Stone included a character from Cameron’s past so it threw a potential ally to him. Right away you could tell that Cameron was an outsider to this world. Something that confused me was why he arrived later than his housemates. Right away I liked his housemate Zeph. I could tell he would be a fun character throughout the novel.

The mystery portion of the book doesn’t start until a few chapters in, and I was curious to see how things would go down. I was sad to see Ariel go because she was a cool character, but I knew going into it to not get too attached to her.

I feel like the investigation portion of the book could have been more compelling. I wasn’t as invested as I felt that I should be. I think part of it could have been that I didn’t really connect with Cameron’s voice.

Something really surprising was the ending. I think this leaves the opportunity for a sequel in the least, if I got the final reveal correctly.

Overall, this book wasn’t too much for me, but I really think this could be a good book for someone else. I recommend you give it a try!

Happy reading,

Sophie 🙂

Posted in Bloggers, Reviews, Sophie

Sneak Peek Sunday: A Very Large Expanse of Sea by Tahereh Mafi

Hi!! I know I haven’t been very active, but I’m breaking my silence to talk about this truly incredible book I read. Minutes ago I finished reading A Very Large Expanse of Sea by Tahereh. This is the author’s contemporary being released this October. Let’s jump right into it!

Title: A Very Large Expanse of Sea

A Very Large Expanse of Sea
Goodreads | Amazon

Author: Tahereh Mafi

Publisher: HarperTeen

Expected Release: October 16, 2018

My rating: 5/5 Goodreads stars

It’s 2002, a year after 9/11. It’s an extremely turbulent time politically, but especially so for someone like Shirin, a sixteen-year-old Muslim girl who’s tired of being stereotyped.

Shirin is never surprised by how horrible people can be. She’s tired of the rude stares, the degrading comments—even the physical violence—she endures as a result of her race, her religion, and the hijab she wears every day. So she’s built up protective walls and refuses to let anyone close enough to hurt her. Instead, she drowns her frustrations in music and spends her afternoons break-dancing with her brother.

But then she meets Ocean James. He’s the first person in forever who really seems to want to get to know Shirin. It terrifies her—they seem to come from two irreconcilable worlds—and Shirin has had her guard up for so long that she’s not sure she’ll ever be able to let it down.


Wow, I don’t even know how to begin to articulate how much I love this book. It is one of my tops reads this year for sure. It is incredible and raw and nothing I’ve read before in my life.

Shirin is a character I fell in love with right away. Sure, she could have handled her relationship with Ocean much better, but to be frank, I’m not sure I would have done much different in her position. It’s very hard to get out of your own head a lot and to have to do it while facing so much prejudice is harder. I know that Shirin acts immature, but isn’t that the point of the story? Isn’t she supposed to grow from the events in the story? She’s also only 16. She’s had to deal with a lot in those years, and it’s not getting any easier throwing in the hardships of being a teenager in general. She’s someone you can relate to even if you don’t directly identify with her background and heritage.

Ocean was a lovely character contrast for Shirin. He was constantly breaking down her barriers which forced her to rethink the way she viewed the world. It was great seeing how their interactions pushed both characters to face things they were afraid to. For Shirin, it was her anger at the world. With Ocean, he had to see the uglier side of the world that he hadn’t been privy to from his place of privilege.

The breakdancing aspect of the book gave space for Shirin to be herself and let go of things. I know it’s something the author loves deeply and it is conveyed well through Shirin.

This story was very personal, and you can tell by the rawness of the emotion and how real they felt. That’s not to say that every story isn’t personal to the author, but this one especially shines through as one.

I can’t wait for you all to read it this October! Make sure to go pre-order yourself a copy and give them both a lot of love!!!

Happy reading,

Sophie 🙂

Sneak Peek Sunday: The War Outside by Moica Hesse

Hi there! I’m back again here (for once), and it’s with a review of a book due out this September. First and foremost, thank you to The Novl for sending me a copy in exchange for my honest review. This in no way affects the way I read and will review it.

Title: The War Outside

The War Outside
Goodreads | Amazon

Author: Monica Hesse

Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

Expected release: September 25, 2018

My rating: 3/5 Goodreads stars

It’s 1944, and World War II is raging across Europe and the Pacific. The war seemed far away from Margot in Iowa and Haruko in Colorado–until they were uprooted to dusty Texas, all because of the places their parents once called home: Germany and Japan.

Haruko and Margot meet at the high school in Crystal City, a “family internment camp” for those accused of colluding with the enemy. The teens discover that they are polar opposites in so many ways, except for one that seems to override all the others: the camp is changing them, day by day and piece by piece. Haruko finds herself consumed by fear for her soldier brother and distrust of her father, who she knows is keeping something from her. And Margot is doing everything she can to keep her family whole as her mother’s health deteriorates and her rational, patriotic father becomes a man who distrusts America and fraternizes with Nazis.

With everything around them falling apart, Margot and Haruko find solace in their growing, secret friendship. But in a prison the government has deemed full of spies, can they trust anyone–even each other?

*************************

There were a lot of good things about this book, but it wasn’t quite the book for me. I really love historical fiction. History is something that always fascinated me, and it was one of my favorite subject in high school. That being said, there were some really cool things about this book that made me keep reading.

This is set in an internment camp that actually exists. The author’s note in the back of the ARC provided a lot of really cool facts about the camp and what it was used for. I love the amount of research and detail that went into this book. It shows through the writing how much labor went into ensuring historical accuracy. Not only that, but this is an internment camp that isn’t talked about often enough in American history. I like that Hesse decided to shed light onto something that is otherwise brushed aside. It gives space and exposure to something that needs it. I wanted to know more about Crystal City the more I read about it through Haruko and Margot, and it compelled me to look a little deeper.

Another part I liked about this book was the dual POV. The story is told from Haruko and Margot’s points of view. They guide the reader first hand through what it was like to experience the internment camp. I can only imagine the feelings they have are very real. It was interesting to see them come together despite their obvious differences. I think they came together because of their differences.

One thing I disliked about this book was that I didn’t feel too attached to either of the main characters. While their voices are strong and the emotion very real, I couldn’t quite buy into either of them.

Overall I recommend this to people looking for a change. I think this one is worth reading purely to learn more about the time period within America with a setting that isn’t explored often enough. This might not have worked too well for me, but it might for you!!

Happy reading,

Sophie 🙂

 

Posted in Bloggers, Reviews, Sophie

Book Review: Save the Date by Morgan Matson

Happy Sunday! I’m back again with another installment of Sneak Peek Sunday where I review a book that has yet to be released! Today I’ll be talking Morgan Matson’s upcoming release Save the Date. I received this copy for something related to Justine, and I can’t wait to share that with you! This is her newest book after The Unexpected Everything which came out in 2016. Without further ado, let’s jump right in.

Title: Save the Date

Save the Date
Goodreads | Amazon

Author: Morgan Matson

Publisher: Simon Schuster Books for Young Readers

Expected release: June 5, 2018

My rating: 4/5 Goodreads stars

Charlie Grant’s older sister is getting married this weekend at their family home, and Charlie can’t wait—for the first time in years, all four of her older siblings will be under one roof. Charlie is desperate for one last perfect weekend, before the house is sold and everything changes. The house will be filled with jokes and games and laughs again. Making decisions about things like what college to attend and reuniting with longstanding crush Jesse Foster—all that can wait. She wants to focus on making the weekend perfect.

The only problem? The weekend is shaping up to be an absolute disaster.

There’s the unexpected dog with a penchant for howling, house alarm that won’t stop going off, and a papergirl with a grudge.

There are the relatives who aren’t speaking, the (awful) girl her favorite brother brought home unannounced, and a missing tuxedo.

Not to mention the neighbor who seems to be bent on sabotage and a storm that is bent on drenching everything. The justice of the peace is missing. The band will only play covers. The guests are all crazy. And the wedding planner’s nephew is unexpectedly, distractingly…cute.

Over the course of three ridiculously chaotic days, Charlie will learn more than she ever expected about the family she thought she knew by heart. And she’ll realize that sometimes, trying to keep everything like it was in the past means missing out on the future.

****************

This was such a cute little contemporary book! I read it during finals weeks, and it was the perfect was to finish it off. I read it for something super fun I got to do for Justine Magazine, which I hope I’ll get to share with you soon.

This book focuses on Charlie’s sister’s wedding. I don’t know about you, but I love weddings. My favorite part of the entire party is the reception. It’s when everyone is relaxed the most and unabashed. I feel like the worst that could happen during a wedding happened at Charlie’s sister’s wedding. From a power outage at the venue to mixed up decorations, Charlie manages to help fix it all.

I loved the Grant family to bits! They reminded me of my own family to be quite honest. I’m the youngest of five, and while it’s no longer a full house here, we still see my siblings often. It’s never a quiet moment with such large families! I love the Grants’ traditions and their little quirks. I would have loved to be part of their fictional family.

Charlie herself was a fun character. She was an overachiever, but someone who is also afraid of change. I can’t say that I blame her, there’s a lot of change senior year not to mention moving from her childhood home. It’s a crazy time, and I can see Charlie struggle when she has to think about it. I love the way her character changes over the course of the novel.

There are also a lot of little Easter eggs from Matson’s other books in here so be sure to keep an eye out for them!

Happy reading,

Sophie 🙂

Posted in Bloggers, Reviews, Sophie

Sneak Peek Sunday: The Summer of Us by Cecilia Vinesse

Hi guys! I’m so glad to be here with you again this weekend to bring another great book. First and foremost, thank you The Novl for sending me an advance copy of this book for review. This has no inherent influence on how I read and review the novel.

Today I’m talking about the wonderful Cecilia Vinesse, author of Seven Days of Youwhich debuted last year. I even had the chance to interview Cecilia for Justine at her event in Naperville when she toured with her book in the U.S. This June, Cecilia is releasing her second book, The Summer of Us. 

Title: The Summer of Us

The Summer of Us
Goodreads | Amazon

Author: Cecilia Vinesse

Publisher: Poppy

Expected release: June 5, 2018

A swoon-worthy story about five best friends on a whirlwind trip through Europe, perfect for fans of Jenny Han, Stephanie Perkins, and Jennifer E. Smith.

American expat Aubrey has only two weeks left in Europe before she leaves for college, and she’s nowhere near ready. Good thing she and her best friend, Rae, have planned one last group trip across the continent. From Paris to Prague, they’re going to explore famous museums, sip champagne in fancy restaurants, and eat as many croissants as possible with their friends Clara, Jonah, and Gabe.

But when old secrets come to light, Aubrey and Rae’s trip goes from a carefree adventure to a complete disaster. For starters, there’s Aubrey and Gabe’s unresolved history, complicated by the fact that Aubrey is dating Jonah, Gabe’s best friend. And then there’s Rae’s hopeless crush on the effortlessly cool Clara. How is Rae supposed to admit her feelings to someone so perfect when they’re moving to different sides of the world in just a few weeks?

Author Cecilia Vinesse delivers a romantic European adventure that embraces the magic of warm summer nights, the thrill of first kisses, and the bittersweet ache of learning to say goodbye to the past while embracing the future.

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I picked this book up a few days ago and finished it in two days. I was in love. It was the perfect book to read after finishing Puddin’. (Review of that to come soon!) I remember how fast I finished Vinesse’s first book, and I couldn’t wait for a second book. Here are some initial thoughts from Goodreads:

I love Vinesse’s writing. I will always love it I think. I can’t wait for you all to read it this summer!! This is a perfect beach read or road trip read. It’s about beginnings and endings and the weird in between feeling. I found it extremely relatable and poignant

This book made me want to travel so bad! I haven’t been outside of the U.S. before and I’m dying to see what’s out there. It made me think of road trips across the U.S., and made me wonder what it would be like to do with my friends. I’m really looking forward to it, but I can see where things could go awry quickly.

It’s written in dual points of view in the third person, and I like that it was limited to only Aubrey and Rae. I feel that it was their story to tell, and while it would have been nice to hear from Clara or Jonah at some parts, I think it would have gotten too messy and lacking in cohesiveness. I love stories about best friends. I’ve had many best friends over my life time, and I think this is something that everyone can relate to. Growing up and growing apart from people is really hard, especially when the person is someone you hold in such high regard. Vinesse writes the dynamic between Aubrey and Rae and their friends so well, and I love the different ways they interact with each other.

Something else that I liked was that it deals a lot with the change after high school. After just going through it, I can attest how weird that period of time is. Everyone is hopeful for the future, but worried about what will come. I wasn’t scared to come to college per se, but I was nervous about making friends. It feels like a huge step in life to just up and move away from everything you’ve known, and I think this is captured perfectly in the book.

Overall, I loved the novel and the story itself. This is a perfect book to read this summer, and I really hope you check it out!

Happy reading,

Sophie 🙂