Book Review: The Fever King by Victoria Lee

Hi guys! I hope you’re having a great Monday. I’m here to discuss one of the books I just finished.

I received a copy of this book for an honest review thanks to the publisher. This does not reflect the way I read and review this book.

Title: The Fever King

Author: Victoria Lee

Publisher: Skyscape

Release date: March 1, 2019

Source: Hardcover, US

My rating: 4/5 Goodreads stars

In the former United States, sixteen-year-old Noam Álvaro wakes up in a hospital bed, the sole survivor of the viral magic that killed his family and made him a technopath. His ability to control technology attracts the attention of the minister of defense and thrusts him into the magical elite of the nation of Carolinia.

The son of undocumented immigrants, Noam has spent his life fighting for the rights of refugees fleeing magical outbreaks—refugees Carolinia routinely deports with vicious efficiency. Sensing a way to make change, Noam accepts the minister’s offer to teach him the science behind his magic, secretly planning to use it against the government. But then he meets the minister’s son—cruel, dangerous, and achingly beautiful—and the way forward becomes less clear.

Caught between his purpose and his heart, Noam must decide who he can trust and how far he’s willing to go in pursuit of the greater good.

This book starts right off in the action. I loved how much I was sucked into this world. It takes a lot of the real-world issues we’re dealing with and discussing and offers a perspective we don’t hear often enough. I think this is one of the best things it does. The book discusses serious issues like immigration and offers a complex argument that shows both sides. It addresses how there are multiple sides of the issue that need to be addressed, but also doesn’t say there is a right or wrong way to handle the issue.

I’m not even just talking about the cool magic in this world. As you read on, you uncover more pieces of the world and what you think you know, through Noam, unravels until you’re not sure who to believe anymore.

One of my favorite things about this book was how it complex the characters were. Even now that I’ve finished it, I don’t know how to feel about Lehrer. He was a chaotic something, and I don’t think his full intentions were shared with the reader.

I do wish some of the other people on Level IV were developed more, but I understand in the scope of the book only Dara and Ames were pertinent to the story. I hope to see more of them in the future! I want to know how they deal with the fallout of book 1.

The writing was excellent. It was a debut novel, but you could tell that Lee and her editor(s) spent a lot of time combing through this novel. I also really liked the style of writing. It’s in third person but focuses on Noam’s voice especially. Because he was the main driver of the novel this made perfect sense.

Overall, I highly recommend this book! It was fun, fast-paced, and the magic and world were awesome.

Happy reading,

Sophie 🙂

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Q & A Friday: Morgan Matson on Change, Weddings, and the Grant Family

Hi, there! Welcome to my last post in this series. If you wanted to read the previous posts I had in this series, you can read them here and here.

Today I’m going to talk about the swoon-worthy novel Save the Date by Morgan Matson. This was the second Matson book I read, and it was such a sweet read. I found the characters so relatable, and I loved the Grant family so much! If you wanted to know more of my thoughts on this book, be sure to check out my review. I can’t wait for you to read this interview I did with Morgan!

A little about Morgan:

morgan dog.jpg

Morgan Matson was born in New York City and grew up there and in Greenwich, Connecticut. She attended Occidental College as a theater major, but halfway through, switched her focus to writing and never looked back. She received an MFA in Writing for Children from the New School, and then a second MFA in Screenwriting from USC.

She is the New York Times bestselling author of five books, all published by Simon & Schuster. 

She currently lives in Los Angeles with her rescue terrier, Murphy, in a house with blue floors that’s overflowing with books.

Website | Twitter | Instagram | Goodreads

Want to know more about Save the Date? Here’ the synopsis!

Charlie Grant’s older sister is getting married this weekend at their family home, and Charlie can’t wait for the first time in years, all four of her older siblings will be under one roof. Charlie is desperate for one last perfect weekend, before the house is sold and everything changes. The house will be filled with jokes and games and laughs again. Making decisions about things like what college to attend and reuniting with longstanding crush Jesse Foster all that can wait. She wants to focus on making the weekend perfect.

The only problem? The weekend is shaping up to be an absolute disaster. There’s the unexpected dog with a penchant for howling, house alarm that won’t stop going off, and a papergirl with a grudge.

There are the relatives who aren’t speaking, the (awful) girl her favorite brother brought home unannounced, and a missing tuxedo. Not to mention the neighbor who seems to be bent on sabotage and a storm that is bent on drenching everything. The justice of the peace is missing. The band will only play covers. The guests are all crazy. And the wedding planner’s nephew is unexpectedly, distractedly cute.

Over the course of three ridiculously chaotic days, Charlie will learn more than she ever expected about the family she thought she knew by heart. And she’ll realize that sometimes, trying to keep everything like it was in the past means missing out on the future.

Buy Links: Amazon | Barnes and Noble | Book Depository | IndieBound

Interview

Hi, Morgan!! Thank you so much for taking time to chat with me about Save the Date. I can’t wait for everyone else to read it. It was such a fun read!

To start things off, why don’t you start by describing your book in 10 words or less.

Okay, I’ll give it a shot! I don’t write short books, so brevity is always a challenge for me. But how about this:

Wedding disaster, little sister, cute boys, unexpected dog, happy ending?

Perfect!! Weddings are so much fun. What made you want to write about one?

Aren’t they? I feel like there’s so much inherent drama in a wedding! All the family members coming together, and people from two different families joining up.  I’ve never been to a wedding where there wasn’t at least one last minute crisis, and so I thought it would be a great setting for a novel. And I also thought it would be fun to write about a wedding not from the POV of the bride or of a planner, but the younger sister, who’s both a part of the wedding and seeing it from the outside. It let me have my (wedding) cake and eat it too!

Charlie’s sister’s wedding goes through quite a few classic wedding disasters. What was the most fun one to write about?

I think the most fun one to write about was the decorations mishap. I thought to myself, what would be the worst event to have your wedding decorations mixed up with? And a nine-year-old’s Australia-themed birthday party seemed to be just the perfect amount of terrible. Nobody wants a wedding with koala decorations!

Yes! That scene was hilarious!! Who doesn’t love koalas anyway 🙂 Do you have a favorite part of a wedding (both fictional and in real life)?

I have two favorite parts of any wedding. The first is the moment when the officiant asks if anyone knows a reason why the couple should not be married, to speak now.  The part of me that loves drama is always holding my breath at that moment, even though I’ve never been to a wedding where anyone has ever said anything.  But we’ve all seen so many movies and TV shows that we’re primed for high drama at that moment!

And my other favorite is the couples’ first dance. It always makes me well up! I love that moment when these two people, who’ve been through this whole ceremony together, are now able to exhale and dance together as a married couple for the first time ever.  In every wedding, you can kind of see the couple look at each other like, “We did it! We’re married!” It’s just my favorite moment.

The dance is so touching! I love it too. I loved the Grant family! They reminded me of mine. Do you have a lot of siblings too? Does the Grant family remind you of your family?

Oh, I’m so glad you liked them! They were such a blast to write. I do not  have a lot of siblings – I have just one older brother, so we were a smaller family. But maybe because of that, I always wanted a ton of siblings and a big family.  I was even jealous of my friends who had three siblings in their families – it just seemed like there was always more going on!

So the Grant family was more of what I’d imagine a big family to be – lots of coming and going and drama and fights and laughter.  I wrote the big family that I always wanted to have! But of course, bits of my family made it in there too – the little sayings and rituals that are totally normal to your family that nobody else understands.  My mom, like Mr. Grant, is a really accomplished gardener, so that’s where that came from.  And parts of the Grant house, especially the front hall and the kitchen, were based on my family’s home in Connecticut.

I also noticed a lot of Easter eggs hiding within your book. How many did you include? What was your favorite part of writing them in?

Good eye! I love including little Easter eggs in my book – it’s one of my favorite parts of writing a new book, getting to check in with characters from other books.  My favorite part was probably getting a bunch of characters from Unexpected Everything in there, especially because in the past, many of my Easter eggs have just been passing references or little hints.  When I saw a way to actually have these characters engage with the Grants, in a way that didn’t feel forced, I got really excited.  I felt like I actually got to reconnect with the characters from Unexpected Everything, and catch everyone up on what they’d been up to.

There’s also a pretty quick reference to Amy from Amy & Roger’s Epic Detour, and most of my books now have had a long-running reference to something first set up in Second Chance Summer, and it pops up again here too.

Charlie struggles a lot with change throughout the book, whether it be moving houses or choosing which school to go to in the fall. Is this something you struggle with yourself? How did your own experience help you shape Charlie’s?

This trait, of struggling with change, is absolutely something that Charlie and I both share.  I hate change, and have ever since I was little.  And Charlie’s feeling regarding going to college in the fall – her ambivalence about it – was my exact same feeling.  All my friends were so excited to be going to college and I just didn’t feel that way. It was like I could sense that what we’d had during our high school years was going to be very different very soon and I just wanted to hold onto it a little longer rather than rushing onto the next chapter.  But like Charlie, I soon realized that life moves only forward and if you can (it’s hard to do) it’s better to think of change like an exciting adventure rather than something to be dreaded.

But since I had this feeling that I hadn’t seen expressed much in books or movies, I wanted to give this to Charlie – and maybe someone else who feels this same way will see their feelings reflected!

I love this! Thank you so much for your time!

Big shout out to Morgan for being amazing! Her interview was awesome, and I had so much fun coming up with questions. Be sure to check out Save the Date if you haven’t already.

Happy reading,

Sophie 🙂

Q & A Friday: Brendan Kiely on Tradition

Hi guys! In the spirit of continuing my mini-series on some fabulous 2018 reads, I have an interview with the great Brendan Kiely, the acclaimed co-author of All American Boys. In 2018, Kiely published his latest novel, Tradition. This book tackles tough topics in an accurate yet sensitive manner. I devoured this book once I started it! I hope you love it as much as I did, and be sure to keep an eye out for a review of it on the blog soon.

Here’s some things you might want to know about Brendan:

Brendan Kiely

Brendan Kiely received an MFA in creative writing from The City College of New York. His writing has appeared in Fiction, Guernica, The AWP Writer’s Chronicle, and other publications. Originally from the Boston area, he now teaches at an independent high school and lives with his wife in Greenwich Village.

Find Brendan here: Website | Twitter | Goodreads | Instagram

Want to know more about Tradition? Here’s the synopsis below!

Prestigious. Powerful. Privileged. This is Fullbrook Academy, an elite prep

school where history looms in the leafy branches over its brick walkways. But some traditions upheld in its hallowed halls are profoundly dangerous.

Jules Devereux just wants to keep her head down, avoid distractions, and get into the right college, so she can leave Fullbrook and its old-boy social codes behind. She wants freedom, but ex-boyfriends and ex-best friends are determined to keep her in place.

Jamie Baxter feels like an imposter at Fullbrook, but the hockey scholarship that got him in has given him a chance to escape his past and fulfill the dreams of his parents and coaches, whose mantra rings in his ears: Don’t disappoint us.

When Jamie and Jules meet, they recognize in each other a similar instinct for survival, but at a school where girls in the student handbook are rated by their looks, athletes stack hockey pucks in dorm room windows like notches on a bedpost, and school-sponsored dances push first year girls out into the night with senior boys, the stakes for safe sex, real love, and true friendship couldn’t be higher.

As Jules and Jamie’s lives intertwine, and the pressures to play by the rules and remain silent about the school’s secrets intensify, they see Fullbrook for what it really is. That tradition, a word Fullbrook hides behind, can be ugly, even violent. Ultimately, Jules and Jamie are faced with the difficult question: can they stand together against classmates—and an institution—who believe they can do no wrong?

Buy Links: Amazon | Barnes and Noble | Book Depository | IndieBound

Interview

Hi, Brendan!! Thank you for taking time to sit down to answer some of my questions. I loved Tradition, and I can’t wait to discuss it!

Thank you so much for reading it, and caring, and thank you for this interview!

To start things off, why don’t you give a brief overview of your book.

            Tradition is about two outsiders, Jules Devereux, a whip-smart, confident, rabble rouser, and James Baxter, a tough, and sensitive kid on a hockey scholarship, who become friends as they learn just how dangerous the school’s old-boy, misogynistic traditions can be. When Jules is assaulted by an ex-boyfriend, she and Bax risk everything they’ve spent their entire high school careers working for to break the school’s culture of silence and complicity.

This is a very heavy, but important topic that you cover, and you write it in such a lovely way. What was it like trying to tackle it?

            Thanks for this question. It means a lot to me. I write contemporary realistic fiction, and though this is a novel, and Jules and James are characters, not people, I try to be as careful as I can because their stories are so viscerally similar to real people’s stories, and so, when I write, I try to listen to the characters with as much care and consideration as if they were real people sitting in front of me, telling me their stories.

I think writing, like living, is all about practicing empathy.

Did you write this book with a certain intention or message?

            All my books begin with a question that is deeply affecting me. In this case it was this: How can our community better listen to and support women, especially those who have been speaking out about misogyny, harassment, and assault for so long, and in particular, how can men become better feminists? I tried to address that question by writing Tradition.

Jules is so awesome. Can you talk a little about where the characters came from? Do you start with characters or a place?

            Thank you! I think Jules is awesome too, because she reminds me of some of those awesome students I had the honor to teach, advise, and watch soar out into the world. I worked in a high school for ten years, and the students who peered around the school’s walls and stared out into the wider world, are the students who inspired Jules. And Bax too. So many young men (myself included) grow up with so much pressure to try to be tough athletes, and when those some of those boys get together, in order to prove to each other how tough they are, how much of a “man” they are, they say terrible things about women, or worse, sometimes act in disrespectful or even harmful ways towards women. But then there are the guys who witness all this and think to themselves, “this isn’t right.” I remember those students too—the guys who did want to listen, the guys who turned around to the other guys and said, enough is enough. Bax and his big, soft heart reminds me of those guys who are out there too.  

I always start with characters. I write scene after scene after scene getting to know them, and though most of those scenes get thrown out, I do it because it takes time getting to know someone—just like in real life!

How did writing these characters and this story contrast from your other works?

I love this question, because I think Jules in particular is so different and unique. As a man writing a book in which half of it is from a woman’s perspective, it was essential for me to get feedback from women along the way. In order to try to be as accountable as possible, I asked nine women to read over my shoulder as I wrote Tradition—while I’ve always asked for feedback from readers while working on a project, I’ve never had so much feedback at once, and I’m forever grateful for the time, attention, and care!

There’s a distinction between a harmful tradition and a fun, silly one. Is there a fun one that you enjoy?

            Yes! Absolutely. Tradition itself isn’t a bad thing, it’s only when the tradition is used an excuse to protect some people while others are being harmed that it’s a problem. Every year in Barcelona, on April 23, couples exchange books and roses with each other, the tradition is called the festival of St. Jordi. It’s been going on forever, and no one really knows how it started, but it’s awesome and still continues today—it’s like a super bookish Valentine’s Day! And closer to home, right where I grew up, it was a tradition for many years that many of the neighborhood families would gather at my friend Adam’s house for Christmas Eve, and his father would make the same calzone every year, and we’d all sit around the piano and sing while another friend’s father played the songs. But what makes these traditions fun is that they are inclusive—everyone feels a part of it. The traditions that bother me are those designer to make some people feel excluded, or insignificant, or disrespected in some way. Those are the kinds of traditions Jules and Bax want to tear down and expose for their ugliness.

Is there anything you’re currently working on that you can share a little about?

            Ahhhh!!! This is always the hardest question because when I’m in the middle of something I never know what it really is until I get to the end of the first draft. I will say this though, I love telling stories that are full of heart and emotion and people learning how to better listen to each other, and my next project follows in the same… well… tradition. Ha! Thanks so much for asking!

Thank you so much to Brendan for taking the time to speak with me on the blog! I encourage you all to go out and get yourselves a copy of this excellent novel.

Happy reading,

Sophie 🙂

Sneak Peek Sunday: The Vanishing Stair by Maureen Johnson

Hey there! I hope you’re having a wonderful holiday season. I’m writing from my home in West Michigan, and I’m glad to finally be home after such a long, hard semester. I’m super excited to bring this review to you of Maureen Johnson’s newest book in the Truly Devious series — The Vanishing Stair which is set to come out January 22 of 2019. If you wanted to read my review of Truly Devious first, look no further than this link! Without further ado, here is more about the book.

Title: The Vanishing Stair

Author: Maureen Johnson

Publisher: Katherine Tegan BFYR

Expected Release: January 22, 2019

My rating: 5/5 Goodreads Stars

All Stevie Bell wanted was to find the key to the Ellingham mystery, but

instead she found her classmate dead. And while she solved that murder, the crimes of the past are still waiting in the dark. Just as Stevie feels she’s on the cusp of putting it together, her parents pull her out of Ellingham academy.

For her own safety they say. She must move past this obsession with crime. Now that Stevie’s away from the school of topiaries and secret tunnels, and her strange and endearing friends, she begins to feel disconnected from the rest of the world. At least she won’t have to see David anymore. David, who she kissed. David, who lied to her about his identity—son of despised politician Edward King. Then King himself arrives at her house to offer a deal: He will bring Stevie back to Ellingham immediately. In return, she must play nice with David. King is in the midst of a campaign and can’t afford his son stirring up trouble. If Stevie’s at school, David will stay put.

The tantalizing riddles behind the Ellingham murders are still waiting to be unraveled, and Stevie knows she’s so close. But the path to the truth has more twists and turns than she can imagine—and moving forward involves hurting someone she cares for. In New York Times bestselling author Maureen Johnson’s second novel of the Truly Devious series, nothing is free, and someone will pay for the truth with their life.

Review

This book was so epic! I couldn’t put it down once I got into it. I got it when I was in the middle of homework, and it took everything in me to not stop what I was doing and dig right in. I absolutely loved getting back into this world and re-familiarizing myself with the characters.

The book picks up right around where Truly Devious finishes. I was anxious to see what had happened to Stevie after that jaw-dropping ending. I thought this book would be the end in a duology, but there definitely will be a third book, and OH MY GOD THAT ENDING!!!!!!!!!!!!

One of my favorite parts about this book is how well it does with representation and how respectful it is of it. You can tell this was written sensitively, and all of the characters are genuine. There is pan rep, Asian-Am rep, and so many others. I really love how this is not The Thing, but A Thing. There needs to be more stories with characters doing things and living their lives — not just about their race/gender/sexuality/etc.

I also really liked how openly Stevie deals with her mental health. There is one part where she has to give herself points for doing small tasks, and that’s a really healthy coping mechanism discussed. I think this part is well written and written true to experience.

Overall, this was an amazing book! I cannot wait for the third book, and I can’t believe it’s going to be about a year until the next one!!! I highly, highly recommend you get yourself a copy. I would not miss out on this sequel!

Author Tour

Did you know Maureen Johnson is going on tour for this book?! I’m so sad this isn’t coming anywhere near me, but be sure to check out the stops and dates along with the other authors going with her! Check it out here.

Happy reading!

Sophie 🙂

Sneak Peek Sunday: The Perfect Candidate by Peter Stone

Hello there and happy Sunday!! I’m happy to be here again with another book that will come to you this Tuesday. Thank you to the publicist for sending me an early review copy! This in no way affected how I read and reviewed this text.

The Perfect Candidate
Goodreads | Amazon

Title: The Perfect Candidate

Author: Peter Stone

Publisher: Simon & Schuster BFYR

Expected release: October 2, 2018

My rating: 3/5 Goodreads stars

From debut author Peter Stone comes a heart-stopping, pulse-pounding political thriller that’s perfect for fans of Ally Carter and House of Cards.

When recent high school graduate Cameron Carter lands an internship with Congressman Billy Beck in Washington, DC, he thinks it is his ticket out of small town captivity. When he lacks connections and Beltway polish he makes up in smarts, and he soon finds a friend and mentor in fellow staffer Ariel Lancaster.

That is, until she winds up dead.

As rumors and accusations about her death fly around Capitol Hill, Cameron’s low profile makes him the perfect candidate for an FBI investigation that he wants no part of. Before he knows it—and with his family’s future at stake—he discovers DC’s darkest secrets as he races to expose a deadly conspiracy.

If it doesn’t get him killed first.


This book was pretty good overall, but slow paced in the beginning. It was really hard to get into at first, so I think that’s why I rated it lower than a four. I had a hard time getting used to Cameron’s voice, and I didn’t quite mesh with it.

This story starts right away with Cameron taking a taxi into Washington D. C. I really liked that Stone included a character from Cameron’s past so it threw a potential ally to him. Right away you could tell that Cameron was an outsider to this world. Something that confused me was why he arrived later than his housemates. Right away I liked his housemate Zeph. I could tell he would be a fun character throughout the novel.

The mystery portion of the book doesn’t start until a few chapters in, and I was curious to see how things would go down. I was sad to see Ariel go because she was a cool character, but I knew going into it to not get too attached to her.

I feel like the investigation portion of the book could have been more compelling. I wasn’t as invested as I felt that I should be. I think part of it could have been that I didn’t really connect with Cameron’s voice.

Something really surprising was the ending. I think this leaves the opportunity for a sequel in the least, if I got the final reveal correctly.

Overall, this book wasn’t too much for me, but I really think this could be a good book for someone else. I recommend you give it a try!

Happy reading,

Sophie 🙂

Sneak Peek Sunday: The War Outside by Moica Hesse

Hi there! I’m back again here (for once), and it’s with a review of a book due out this September. First and foremost, thank you to The Novl for sending me a copy in exchange for my honest review. This in no way affects the way I read and will review it.

Title: The War Outside

The War Outside
Goodreads | Amazon

Author: Monica Hesse

Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers

Expected release: September 25, 2018

My rating: 3/5 Goodreads stars

It’s 1944, and World War II is raging across Europe and the Pacific. The war seemed far away from Margot in Iowa and Haruko in Colorado–until they were uprooted to dusty Texas, all because of the places their parents once called home: Germany and Japan.

Haruko and Margot meet at the high school in Crystal City, a “family internment camp” for those accused of colluding with the enemy. The teens discover that they are polar opposites in so many ways, except for one that seems to override all the others: the camp is changing them, day by day and piece by piece. Haruko finds herself consumed by fear for her soldier brother and distrust of her father, who she knows is keeping something from her. And Margot is doing everything she can to keep her family whole as her mother’s health deteriorates and her rational, patriotic father becomes a man who distrusts America and fraternizes with Nazis.

With everything around them falling apart, Margot and Haruko find solace in their growing, secret friendship. But in a prison the government has deemed full of spies, can they trust anyone–even each other?

*************************

There were a lot of good things about this book, but it wasn’t quite the book for me. I really love historical fiction. History is something that always fascinated me, and it was one of my favorite subject in high school. That being said, there were some really cool things about this book that made me keep reading.

This is set in an internment camp that actually exists. The author’s note in the back of the ARC provided a lot of really cool facts about the camp and what it was used for. I love the amount of research and detail that went into this book. It shows through the writing how much labor went into ensuring historical accuracy. Not only that, but this is an internment camp that isn’t talked about often enough in American history. I like that Hesse decided to shed light onto something that is otherwise brushed aside. It gives space and exposure to something that needs it. I wanted to know more about Crystal City the more I read about it through Haruko and Margot, and it compelled me to look a little deeper.

Another part I liked about this book was the dual POV. The story is told from Haruko and Margot’s points of view. They guide the reader first hand through what it was like to experience the internment camp. I can only imagine the feelings they have are very real. It was interesting to see them come together despite their obvious differences. I think they came together because of their differences.

One thing I disliked about this book was that I didn’t feel too attached to either of the main characters. While their voices are strong and the emotion very real, I couldn’t quite buy into either of them.

Overall I recommend this to people looking for a change. I think this one is worth reading purely to learn more about the time period within America with a setting that isn’t explored often enough. This might not have worked too well for me, but it might for you!!

Happy reading,

Sophie 🙂

 

Book Review: From Twinkle, With Love by Sandhya Menon

Hi there, happy new book Tuesday! There are so many amazing books coming out today, including Strange Fascinations (YAY NOAH AND DAVID!!). Today I’m happy to usher in this lovely new read, From Twinkle, With Love by Sandhya Menon. I had the opportunity to read When Dimple Met Rishi early as well, and guys, this book does NOT disappoint!

***Thank you to the publisher for sending me an early finished copy for review. This does not affect my reading/reviewing of this title.***

Title: From Twinkle, With Love

From Twinkle, with Love
Goodreads | Amazon

Author: Sandhya Menon

Publisher: Simon Pulse

Release date: May 22, 2018

My rating: 5/5 Goodreads stars

Aspiring filmmaker and wallflower Twinkle Mehra has stories she wants to tell and universes she wants to explore, if only the world would listen. So when fellow film geek Sahil Roy approaches her to direct a movie for the upcoming Summer Festival, Twinkle is all over it. The chance to publicly showcase her voice as a director? Dream come true. The fact that it gets her closer to her longtime crush, Neil Roy—a.k.a. Sahil’s twin brother? Dream come true x 2.

When mystery man “N” begins emailing her, Twinkle is sure it’s Neil, finally ready to begin their happily-ever-after. The only slightly inconvenient problem is that, in the course of movie-making, she’s fallen madly in love with the irresistibly adorkable Sahil.

Twinkle soon realizes that resistance is futile: The romance she’s got is not the one she’s scripted. But will it be enough?

Told through the letters Twinkle writes to her favorite female filmmakers, From Twinkle, with Love navigates big truths about friendship, family, and the unexpected places love can find you.


Review

Listen, I really loved this novel. You need to go buy it right now. Like, what are you doing reading this review and not buying the book? NOT TO BE DRAMATIC, BUT YOU SHOULD GET ON THAT RIGHT NOW! I WILL WAIT!!!

*sips an Arnold Palmer*

*flips threw current read*

Ah yes, welcome back! I’m so glad you decided to get this book! It’s truly wonderful, and I love every bit of it. I can’t wait for you to love it too.

Twinkle was a truly fun character. She grew so much throughout the story. While it was written in the first person, I feel that you can tell through the dialogue how she changes and grows. I love how she finds her voice directing the movie. (I totally wish this remake existed because I would watch the crap out of it!!) She definitely had her flaws and her frustrating moments, but in the end, I like what she made of it all.

The story is written in an epistolary format, and at first I wasn’t sure if I would like it. However, right away I was proven wrong in any doubts I had. I love the way the style feeds into the narrative as a whole. While it is mostly sort of a diary, you still get a lot of dialogue, setting, and description. I love how it makes Twinkle more personable and it made the whole thing more intimate.

One small complaint about the book is how mature the teenagers acted. I feel like that was a little bit of a reach, and while I do wish things were resolved like this more often in real life, I don’t think it would always happen like this.

I absolutely 100% love the diversity in this book. While this is mainly about a Desi girl there are many other characters within the story that bring in more rep to the story. It is well written and not forced. Menon expertly weaves in different rep within the book, and I really appreciate it.

Well, that’s all I’ve got for now folks. If you didn’t get yourself a copy go do it now! Links above!!

From,

Sophie 🙂

With love

Book Review: Isla and the Happily Ever After by Stephanie Perkins

Hi there! I finished out the three companion novels by Stephanie Perkins, and I was a bit disappointed with this one. More to come on that though. It was a cute book, and all three of them together make a great aesthetic.

Here’s some things you may want to know:

Love ignites in the City That Never Sleeps, but can it last?

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Goodreads | Amazon


Hopeless romantic Isla has had a crush on introspective cartoonist Josh since their first year at the School of America in Paris. And after a chance encounter in Manhattan over the summer, romance might be closer than Isla imagined. But as they begin their senior year back in France, Isla and Josh are forced to confront the challenges every young couple must face, including family drama, uncertainty about their college futures, and the very real possibility of being apart.

Featuring cameos from fan-favorites Anna, Étienne, Lola, and Cricket, this sweet and sexy story of true love—set against the stunning backdrops of New York City, Paris, and Barcelona—is a swoonworthy conclusion to Stephanie Perkins’s beloved series.

Publisher: Speak

Publish date: August 14, 2014                                Page #: 339

Edition: Paperback, USA                                          My rating: 3.5/5 stars

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I have to say that I liked this least of the three Stephanie Perkins novels. It wasn’t as developed as the others, and I wish I had gotten to know Isla more beyond her obsession with Josh.

One question that is asked is if you have to read them in order. You may prefer to because they build off each other and there are cameos of old characters in the new books. If you’re curious to know what I thought about Anna and Lola just click their names and it’ll take you to those reviews.

Isla was underdeveloped. I feel like she had so much potential, especially after Anna and Lola. She only thought about Josh and how he affected her and vice versa. It felt like her life revolved around this guy she’d had a crush on for a while. Though this isn’t awful I felt like she needed a hobby or passion. Anna had film, Lola had fashion, and Isla… had Josh. I know part of her story is that she doesn’t have a passion. She doesn’t know what she wants to do with her life, but I feel like she could have had so much more than just be in love with a boy.

One of my favorite characters was Kurt. He is straightforward and no-nonsense. I appreciate the little details Perkins includes in her writing. Lola had 2 dads. Kurt has high-functioning Asperger’s syndrome. They are never the thing in her plots but they add depth and texture too them that isn’t in your typical contemporary.

Despite my qualms about Isla (and her poor decision making) this was a pretty okay book. It was nice to hear about the other characters and how they’re doing, especially Anna and Etienne. It’s a cute contemporary read if you’re looking for one.

Happy reading,

Sophie 🙂